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It was 100 years ago today that after mass protests in St Petersburg (or Petrograd as it was later called) Lenin declared the dismissal of the provisional government in Russia and the enthronement of the dictatorship of the proletariat. For the masses of the Russian people suffering from war and oppression, religious hypocrisy and arrogance of the ruling aristocrats, this sounded like the biggest promise of a bright, all happy future.

Communism became the biggest illusion, and Lenin later coined the phrase that it will be achieved by this simple recipe: Political power of the Bolschewiki plus electrification of the whole country.

70 years later, in 1987 during a warm September Indian summer, I was struck by my own big illusion. I was sitting with Rita in one of the rattan beach chairs at the Baltic sea side, to where we both escaped for a few days to leave the University routine behind. There was the tranquil whispering of the baby waves along the shore, and the silk sand below or feet, and a warmth went through my whole body which  I can not tell any more how much of it came from the intense evening sun, how much cam from Ritas dark, very dark skin, and how much came from my own heart, which was near the edge of getting its communist initiation.

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The roofed wicker beach chair (Heiligendamm, Baltic Sea ) where I almost had my communist revelation.

Always being a heretic and experiencing communist ideology as the most annoying subject in school and university,  a doctrine only meant to subdue our quest for a free and self determined life, I was close to turn into an devotee of this illusional idea during these days and evenings at the lonely beach. With Rita’s West-African warmth under the blanket next to me, the red glowing evening sun shining on us like in an agit-prop poster, and a bottle of cheap, sweet wine left for some more hours of this day, everything seemed possible for a perfect communist future. And if these days would have lasted a bit longer, and if Rita would not have told me a few month after our beach break at the Baltic Sea that she is looking for somebody with material wealth, and if not – very well in time – two years later the communist ideology started to crumble all together, it might have indeed guided me on a strange path of political blindness. Rita was notorious for her strong belief in Marxism-Leninism, despite her overt quest for material wealth and luxury life style. For me this all was secondary, and just for the prospective to be together with her, having her dark skin and African heat always next to me I was all to happy to accept both.

Maybe these days on the coast of the Baltic Sea at the spa Heiligendamm was one of the few moments in life when important decision are made, not only by one self, but also by accidental episodes.

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